Six Tigers Named Associated Press All-Americans

Clemson, S.C.-Clemson had a national best and school record six players named to one of the three Associated Press All-America teams announced on Monday.  The list included three of Clemson’s four defensive linemen and four defenders overall.

Clelin Ferrell (DE) was named first-team by AP, while Mitch Hyatt (OT), Christian Wilkins (DT) and Dorian O’Daniel (LB) were second-team selections.   Tyrone Crowder (OG) and Austin Bryant (DE) were third team selections.

The previous best for Associated Press All-Americans in a season by the Clemson program is five by the 2016 National Championship team.  It marks the first time Clemson has had three defensive lineman named All-American in the same season.

Ferrell, a redshirt sophomore, is fourth on the Clemson team in tackles with 61 and has a team best 17 tackles or loss, including 8.5 sacks.    He joins Deshaun Watson (sophomore, 2015) and Sammy Watkins (freshman, 2011) as the only Clemson freshman or sophomores to make first-team AP All-American.

Bryant was a third-team All-American selection by Associated Press, but he was a first-team selection by the Football Writers Association on Monday.   Bryant is second to Ferrell in tackles for loss and sacks.  The junior from Pavo, Ga has 14.5 tackles for loss and 7.5 sacks.

Wilkins is the only returning All-American from last year’s team.  A third-team selection by AP last year, the native of Springfield, Mass was a second-team choice by Associated Press on Monday.  He was named second team by the Walter Camp Foundation last week.

O’Daniel was a second team selection by AP, but was earlier a first-team choice by Sports Illustrated. The graduate leads Clemson in tackles with 99, including 10.5 tackles for loss and a team best four takeaways.

Hyatt is the leader of Clemson’s strong offensive line.  He has been named second team All-American by seven services so far.  The native of Georgia has started 41 games the last three years.  Graduate Tyrone Crowder was named a third-team AP All-American as an offensive guard.

With 11 All-America teams announced so far, Clemson has eight players named first, second or third team All-American by some service.  Earlier Dexter Lawrence was named third team by the website Sports on Earth at defensive tackle.  Ray-Ray McCloud was a second team selection as a punt returner by Pro Football Focus.

 

Clemson All-America Summary

 

Austin Bryant:  Football Writers Association (1), Walter Camp (2), Associated Press (3),

 

Clelin Ferrell:  Associated Press (1), Sports on Earth (1),  Football Writers Association (2), USA Today (2), The All-American (2), Sports Illustrated (2)

 

Dorian O’Daniel: Sports Illustrated (1), Bleacher Report (1), Associated Press (2),

 

Christian Wilkins:  Associated Press (2), Walter Camp (2), Sports on Earth (3)

 

Dexter Lawrence:  Sports on Earth (3)

 

Mitch Hyatt: Associated Press (2), USA Today (2), Football Writers Association (2), Walter Camp (2), The All-American (2), Sports on Earth (2), College Football News (2)

 

Tyrone Crowder:  Associated Press (3), College Football News (HM)

 

Justin Falcinelli:  College Football News (HM)

 

Ray-Ray McCloud:  Pro Football Focus (2, Punt returner)

Three Tigers Named Walter Camp All-Americans

 
CLEMSON, S.C. – Three Tigers were named to the 128th edition of the Walter Camp All-America team, announced Thursday night. Junior defensive end Austin Bryant, junior offensive tackle Mitch Hyatt and junior defensive lineman Christian Wilkins were all second-team All-America selections for the nation’s oldest All-America team.
 
Bryant and Wilkins are big reasons Clemson is in the top 10 in the nation in many defensive statistical categories. Bryant has 54 tackles, 14.5 tackles for loss, 7.5 sacks, two pass breakups, 10 quarterback pressures and an interception in 609 snaps over 13 starts. Wilkins has 47 tackles, 8.5 tackles for loss, 4.5 sacks, four pass breakups and 10 quarterback pressures in 602 snaps over 13 contests. It marked the second-consecutive year Wilkins was named to the Walter Camp All-America team.
 
Hyatt has totaled 28 knockdowns in 772 snaps over 12 starts this season and has started 41 of his 42 games in his three-year career. He has played an important role in Clemson averaging 35.4 points per game and 448.2 yards per game in 2017, including over 200 yards per game rushing and passing.

Elliott Wins Broyles Award

Clemson, S.C.—Clemson Co-Offensive Coordinator and running backs coach Tony Elliott received the Frank Broyles Award on Tuesday as the National Assistant Coach of the Year on college football.  The presentation was made at a luncheon in Little Rock, Arkansas by  the Frank & Barbara Broyles Foundation.

With Elliott’s selection, Clemson became the first school two have winners of the Broyles Award in consecutive years in the 22-year history of the award.  Clemson Defensive Coordinator Brent Venables won the award in 2016, and he was on hand Tuesday to present Elliott with the award.

Other finalists for the 2017 award were Kevin Steele of Auburn, Bill Bedenbaugh of Oklahoma, Troy Walters of Central Florida and Jim Leonhard of Wisconsin.

“I am so happy for Tony Elliott,’ said Clemson Head Coach Dabo Swinney.  “To have back-to-back winners of the Broyles Award speaks to the success of our program.  A lot of credit for this goes to our players and staff.

“This is special for me personally because I coached Tony my first year in 2003 when I was receivers coach.  I have had a front row seat to his career as a player and a coach and I am so proud to have him recognized as the top assistant coach in the nation.”

Elliott has helped Clemson to a 12-1 record so far this year and a No. 1 ranking according to Associated Press, the Amway Coaches Poll and the College Football Playoff Poll.      The Tigers have a school record six wins over Top 25 teams and have a 9-0 record against bowl teams in 2017.

Since Elliott and Jeff Scott have been Co-Coordinators of the Clemson offense, the Tigers have a 41-3 record, including a 16-1 record against Top 25 opponents.

Clemson’s offense lost players who accounted for 77 percent of the total offense in 2016, 127th out of 130 FBS teams.   But the Tigers have exceeded expectations on offense by ranking fourth in the nation in rushing touchdowns (40), sixth in completion percentage (.670), 10th in total touchdowns (62) and 10th in third down conversion percentage (.476).

Clemson averages 35.4 points per game, 21st in the nation and 449 yards of total offense per game.  The Tigers average 205 yards a game rushing and 244 passing and are on pace to be just the third team in Clemson history to average at least 200 rushing and 200 passing in the same season.

12/2: Clemson “Leaves No Doubt” in 38-3 Win Over Miami

“Leave No Doubt.” – Dabo Swinney

 

The second largest crowd in ACC Championship history witnessed Clemson’s dominance against an exhausted and outmatched Miami team, and the hungry Tigers clinched their third straight playoff spot. Clemson left no doubt that they are deserving of the number one seed and a spot in the playoffs.

 

Clemson and Kelly Bryant came out of the locker room blazing hot, posting a 7-0 lead on their opening drive with only one bad play (an incomplete pass).

 

Ray Ray McCloud fumbled twice early, but the Hurricanes failed to capitalize on their opportunities. Miami’s Michael Badgley missed the 46-yard field goal from the first fumble, and Milan Richard recovered the second fumble en-route to Clemson’s second score.

 

Kelly Bryant finished Clemson’s second drive with an 11-yard scramble to put the Tigers up 14-0 near the end of the first quarter.

 

Adam Choice was Clemson’s bell-cow back on their next drive rushing for seven of the play’s nine drives, including three times at the one.

 

On third and goal from the one, Clemson used the Power-G concept to push the ball through with Adam Choice with 3:46 left in the first half. The 21-0 lead tied the ACC Championship record for the largest lead.

Clemson gained 214 yards on their next four drives, while converting their first seven third downs of the night – their fortune was about to change.

 

Neither team was able to conduct a meaningful drive to close out the half, and Clemson carried a 21-0 lead in the locker room.

 

Miami started off their opening drive of the second half well, but a Dexter Lawrence sack on third-and-4 forced the Canes to punt. Feagles’ 39-yard punt was nearly negated, as McCloud’s 19 yard return combined with Finley’s 15-yard facemask penalty gave Clemson the ball past midfield.

 

Clemson’s drive ended with an oh-so-close career high 46-yard field goal by Alex Spence to advance Clemson’s lead to 24-0.

 

Malik Rosier’s 18-yard pass to Jeff Thomas start their next drive appeared to be the spark the Hurricanes needed, but Ryan Carter forced a fumble that was recovered by Dorian O’Daniel.

 

After starting off white-hot for the first twenty minutes of the game, Clemson struggled in another three-and-out offensive series. That drive was the end of an offensive drought for the Tigers that consisted of four drives for 33 yards.

 

When Ryan Carter quoted Coach Venables by saying “When the opportunity knocks, you just got to be able to make plays.”, he remembered when he forced the second Miami turnover of the game by catching Rosier’s tipped pass – and this time Clemson capitalized.

 

Tavien Feaster burst onto the scene with his 11-yard score to extend Clemson’s lead to 31-0 with 3:17 left in the third quarter. Feaster became the fourth different player to score a rushing touchdown for the Tigers in the game.

 

DJ Dallas ran for 26 yards on three carries as the wildcat quarterback before Malik Rosier returned to the field. Rosier’s return meant yet another turnover.

 

On Rosier’s second play of the drive, Dexter Lawrence deflected a pass that Kendall Joseph intercepted and returned 37 yards to give Clemson the ball on the 13-yard line.

 

Malik Rosier described Clemson as, “a great defense” that “plays sound football and that’s what wins you games.”

 

CJ Fuller fumbled the ball on the ensuing play, but Tremayne Anchrum saved the drive by recovering the fumble for a negative 14-yard loss.

 

On second-and-24, Kelly Bryant threw a beautiful deep ball to Deon Cain for a 27-yard score. The pass widened Clemson’s lead to 38-0 while giving Deon Cain his 20th touchdown pass – he is the fifth player in Clemson history to achieve this feat.

 

After forcing a Miami three-and-out, Clemson started their drive on their own side of the field instead of Miami’s for the first time in five drives.

 

Kelly Bryant in the words of Ray Ray McCloud) was “[an] animal. Just in beast mode ready to lead this team. He was hungry… humble and ready to lead this team to another national championship.”

He started out 15-15, then went 1-7 before finishing the night with seven straight completions. Bryant played his arguably best game of the year so far, going 23 for 29 for 252 passing yards and two total touchdowns.

 

Fans saw a rare sight for championship games – the backup quarterbacks, specifically Hunter Johnson and later Zerrick Cooper.

 

After Ray Ray McCloud’s two fumbles, he bounced back to be the Tiger’s receiving leader with 6 catches for 100 yards.

 

Despite Clemson’s dominance of the game, they struggled on the ground. The Tigers rushed 41 times for 77 yards, but passed 254 times on 34 attempts.

 

Clemson’s defense held Miami to 104 rushing yards on 30 attempts, and 110 passing yards and two interceptions on 29 attempts.

 

2017 was supposed to be “Florida State’s year”, and a “rebuilding year” for Clemson – but in Coach Swinney’s words, “We are the attacking champs for another one. We aren’t defending anything.”

 

Clemson has clinched a conference championship and a playoff spot for the third time in three years.

 

Clemson is playing its best football at the most important time of the year – the Championship phase.

 

“Don’t take winning for granted, because its not easy.” – Kendall Joseph

 

12/2: Clemson Storm Hurricanes with 21-0 Halftime Lead

Recap:

 

Clemson scored on their opening drive for the eighth time this year, and the ten play, 68-yard drive only had one negative play (an incomplete pass early).

 

After a three-and-out by Miami, Ray Ray McCloud muffed the punt after tripping to give Miami the ball 34 yards further down the field. Michael Badgley’s 46-yard field goal from the left hash was wide left and no good.

 

A deep strike from Kelly Bryant to Ray Ray McCloud was completed for 25 yards, safety Sheldrick Redwine forced the fumble, and Milan Richard recovered the fumble 15 yards further down the field.

 

Kelly Bryant’s 11-yard scramble to the left corner of the end zone put the Tigers up 14-0 with 3:02 left in the first quarter. Miami’s three and out ended with a 16-yard punt by Zach Feagles.

 

The 14-0 lead at the end of the first quarter is the largest lead at the end of the first quarter in ACC Championship Game history.

 

Out of the nine plays on Clemson’s next scoring drive, seven were runs by Adam Choice. His 1-yards rushing touchdown gave Clemson a 21-0 lead with 12:49 in the first half, tying the record for the biggest lead in the ACC Championship’s game history and was the largest for Miami this year.

 

Kelly Bryant completed five straight passes before the drive stalled, but he threw an 18-yard strike to McCloud on third-and-16 to keep the drive alive.

 

Bryant completed his first 15 passes of the half (for 164 yards), breaking Deshaun Watson’s record for most consecutive completions to start the ACC Championship game.

 

Bryant then threw three straight incomplete passes (one was dropped) that ended in the first failed third down conversion and punt for the Tigers of the night.

 

Neither team managed to mount a significant drive in the rest of the half, and Clemson entered halftime with a 21-0 lead.

 

Interesting events:

 

Ray Ray McCloud muffed Miami’s first punt, but Miami couldn’t capitalize on the second chance and missed a field goal. On the next drive, McCloud fumbled after deep pass that Milan Richard recovered.

 

Clemson Positives:

 

Kelly Bryant played his best half of the year so far and broke the ACC Championship record for the most consecutive completions to start the game with 15.

 

Clemson’s defense has held Miami to 64 total yards on 26 plays, while scoring three rushing touchdowns on Miami’s vaunted defense – the most the Hurricanes have surrendered this year.

 

Clemson Negatives:

 

Ray Ray McCloud fumbled twice early in the game, but Miami was unable to capitalize on his mistakes.

 

Clemson’s offense stalled to end the first half: Kelly Bryant completed his first fifteen passes before missing his last five, while Clemson’s last three drives ended in zero total points.

 

Path to Victory:

 

Kelly Bryant needs to settle back down and gain back his confidence, and Clemson will need to impose their will on Miami by running the ball. Most importantly, don’t let Miami hang around and sneak into the game. If Clemson can finish the game out, they will earn their third consecutive trip to the playoffs.

12/1: ACC Championship Preview

Miami may be hurting as of late, but the U is back in 2017. The U Part III is led by a revitalized, goatee wearing Mark Richt and known for the Turnover Chain.

 

Miami is 4-0 in games decided by eight points or less this year while Clemson has won close games for years; so both teams think they can win a close battle.

 

Miami is limping into Charlotte to play its eleventh consecutive game with no break, and the stretch is taking its toll. The Hurricanes struggled with 6-6 Virginia and then lost to Pittsburgh (5-7) 24-14 in the two weeks heading into Saturday’s matchup.

 

Senior star tight end Christopher Herndon’s season ended with an injury at Pittsburgh, while star receiver Ammon Richard’s season came to an abrupt end at Wednesday’s practice.

 

Miami leads the nation with an average turnover margin of 1.55 and is near the top with 29 turnovers. While this is partly due to skill, this streak involves luck that will run out at some point. On the other hand, Clemson team has a positive turnover margin for the first time since 2014.

 

Sophomore running back Travis Homer and junior quarterback Malik Rosier combine for 70 percent of Miami’s rushing attempts. Slot receiver Braxton Berrios has 45 catches, but none of the other healthy players have more than 18 catches.

 

Clemson has one of the most efficient and one of the least explosive offenses in the nation, which bodes well for the Tigers. Miami’s defense is excellent, but not having a break for almost three months is devastating to a team, similar to Clemson in 2015.

 

Miami may be hungry after their loss to Pittsburgh, but that doesn’t change the effect of losing their bye week and two key players in a week.

 

Prediction: Clemson 28 Miami 21

12/1: ACC Championship Preview

Miami may be hurting as of late, but the U is back in 2017. The U Part III is led by a revitalized, goatee wearing Mark Richt and known for the Turnover Chain.

 

Miami is 4-0 in games decided by eight points or less this year while Clemson has won close games for years; so both teams think they can win a close battle.

 

Miami is limping into Charlotte to play its eleventh consecutive game with no break, and the stretch is taking its toll. The Hurricanes struggled with 6-6 Virginia and then lost to Pittsburgh (5-7) 24-14 in the two weeks heading into Saturday’s matchup.

 

Senior star tight end Christopher Herndon’s season ended with an injury at Pittsburgh, while star receiver Ammon Richard’s season came to an abrupt end at Wednesday’s practice.

 

Miami leads the nation with an average turnover margin of 1.55 and is near the top with 29 turnovers. While this is partly due to skill, this streak involves luck that will run out at some point. On the other hand, Clemson team has a positive turnover margin for the first time since 2014.

 

Sophomore running back Travis Homer and junior quarterback Malik Rosier combine for 70 percent of Miami’s rushing attempts. Slot receiver Braxton Berrios has 45 catches, but none of the other healthy players have more than 18 catches.

 

Clemson has one of the most efficient and one of the least explosive offenses in the nation, which bodes well for the Tigers. Miami’s defense is excellent, but not having a break for almost three months is devastating to a team, similar to Clemson in 2015.

 

Miami may be hungry after their loss to Pittsburgh, but that doesn’t change the effect of losing their bye week and two key players in a week.

 

Prediction: Clemson 28 Miami 21

11/30: Bryant Finalist for Manning Award

Clemson, S.C.—Clemson quarterback Kelly Bryant has been named one of 11 finalists for the 2017 Manning Award. The winner will be announced after the bowls in January and will be honored at a ceremony in New Orleans.   Former Clemson quarterback Deshaun Watson was the recipient each of the last two years.

 

The Manning Award was created by the Allstate Sugar Bowl in honor of the college football accomplishments of Archie, Peyton and Eli Manning. It is the only quarterback award that takes the candidates’ bowl performances into consideration in its balloting.

 

The finalists are J.T. Barrett of Ohio State, Kelly Bryant of Clemson, Sam Darnold of Southern California, Jalen Hurts of Alabama, Lamar Jackson of  Louisville, Baker Mayfield of Oklahoma, Trace McSorley of Penn State, McKenzie Milton of UCF, Mason Rudolph of Oklahoma State, Jarrett Stidham of Auburn and Kahlil Tate of Arizona.

 

Bryant has led Clemson to an 11-1 record and a unanimous No. 1 ranking in all major college football polls, including the College Football Playoff Poll. He has completed 221 of 333 passes for 2426 yards and 12 touchdowns.  He has thrown just six interceptions.  He is also Clemson’s second leading rusher with 639 yards and 10 touchdowns.

 

“We’ve had a great year of college football once again,” said Archie Manning. “Quarterbacks all around the country had great performances week-in and week-out and I want to thank our voting panel for the time and effort they put into selecting the best in the country for this honor. Now we all have the opportunity to watch these outstanding players in the biggest games of the year – the conference championships, the bowl games and the playoff games. I’m looking forward to another exciting finish to the season.”

 

Statistically, the group of finalists excels in nearly every category as they average over 3,000 yards passing while accounting for a total of 357 touchdowns. The group has thrown nearly four times as many touchdown passes as interceptions. In addition, six of the finalists ran for over 400 yards on the year with eight of them tallying eight or more rushing touchdowns. Eight of the 10 led their teams to double digits in victories, while all 11 have led their teams to bowl eligibility. Six of this year’s Manning Award finalists will be competing in conference championship games this weekend.

 

 

Louisville’s Jackson Repeats as ACC Player of the Year NC State’s Chubb is Defensive Player of the Year

GREENSBORO, N.C. (theACC.com) – Louisville junior quarterback Lamar Jackson is the repeat selection as the Atlantic Coast Conference Player of the Year, the league announced Wednesday.
NC State senior defensive end Bradley Chubb was recognized as the league’s Defensive Player of the Year.
The award winners were chosen by a vote of a select 45-member media panel and the league’s 14 head coaches.
Jackson – also voted the ACC’s Offensive Player of the Year for the second year in a row – leads the nation in total offense with 4,932 yards and total offense per game (411.0). He is on pace to set ACC season and career records for total yards per game and season records for total yards. The reigning Heisman Trophy winner currently leads the conference in both passing (3,489) and rushing yardage (1,443) and is bidding to become the first quarterback to lead the league in the latter category.
The Pompano Beach, Florida, native is the first player in Louisville history to have two seasons with at least 1,300 yards rushing. Jackson is now responsible for 116 touchdowns in his career (42 this season), tying Clemson’s Deshaun Watson (2014-16) for second on the ACC’s all-time list.
Jackson is the sixth student-athlete to be named the ACC Football Player of the Year in back-to-back seasons and the first since Florida State’s Charlie Ward in 1992 and 1993. Jackson is also the first FBS player to throw for at least 3,000 yards and rush for 1,000 in consecutive seasons. He is a finalist for a number of national honors, including the Walter Camp National Player of the Year.
Jackson led the overall ACC Player of the Year balloting with 51 votes. Chubb was named on six ballots, while Clemson defensive linemen Clelin Ferrell and Christian Wilkins each received one vote.
Jackson’s margin was even wider in the Offensive Player of the Year voting, where he was the choice on 57 of the 59 ballots. Clemson quarterback Kelly Bryant and NC State all-purpose back Jaylen Samuels each received one vote.
The Wolfpack’s Chubb leads the ACC in quarterback sacks (10) and ranks second nationally in tackles for loss (26). The Marietta, Georgia, standout’s senior season has assured that he will graduate from NC State as the program’s all-time leader in both categories (26 sacks, 60 tackles for loss).
A 2017 first-team All-ACC selection, Chubb was voted the ACC Defensive Lineman of the Week three times during the regular season. He is a finalist for both the Chuck Bednarik and Bronko Nagurski Awards, which are presented annually to the outstanding defensive player in the nation, as well as a semifinalist for the Ted Hendricks Award presented to the nation’s top defensive end. He was also a semifinalist for the Walter Camp National Player of the Year.
Chubb led the ACC Defensive Player of the Year balloting with 45 votes. Clemson’s Wilkins and Farrell were the next closest with four votes each.
2017 ACC PLAYER OF THE YEAR VOTING
Player of the Year
Lamar Jackson, Louisville (51)
Bradley Chubb, NC State (6)
Clelin Farrell, Clemson (1)
Christian Wilkins, Clemson (1)
Offensive Player of the Year
Lamar Jackson, Louisville (57)
Kelly Bryant, Clemson (1)
Jaylen Samuels, NC State (1)
Defensive Player of the Year
Bradley Chubb, NC State (45)
Clelin Farrell, Clemson (4)
Christian Wilkins, Clemson (4)
Micah Kiser, Virginia (2)
Quin Blanding, Virginia (2)
Jaquan Johnson, Miami (1)
Shaquille Quarterman, Miami (1)

11/27: Seventeen Clemson Players Named All-ACC

For Immediate Release

Clemson, S.C.–Six Clemson interior linemen, three on offense and three on defense, were named first-team All-ACC on November 27.    The first-team selections on offense were tackle Mitch Hyatt, center Justin Falcinelli and guard Tyrone Crowder.   The first-team selections on defense were defensive end Clelin Ferrell and tackles Christian Wilkins and Dexter Lawrence.

 

It marked the first time Clemson had six linemen earn first-team all-conference honors.  The previous high was just four set eight previous seasons, including 2016.

 

Overall, 13 Clemson players were named first, second or third team All-ACC, seven on offense and six on defense.

 

It was the second consecutive year Clemson had three starting offensive linemen earn first-team honors.  Crowder and Hyatt both were first-team selections last year as well.  It was the first All-ACC selection for Falcinelli, who is in his first year as a starter.

 

Wilkins and Lawrence were second-team selections last year on defense, while Ferrell was named for the first time as a red-shirt sophomore.  Ferrell leads the team in tackles for loss and sacks.

 

Dorian O’Daniel, Clemson’s leading tackler, made the second team along with Austin Bryant.  O’Daniel was the top vote getter on the second team defense and has 95 tackles and two interception returns for scores. Bryant is second on the team in tackles for loss and sacks.  He had four sacks in the win over Auburn in September.

 

Five Clemson offensive players were named third-team All-ACC.   Receivers Hunter Renfrow and Deon Cain were both named.  Renfrow had two receiving touchdowns in the win over South Carolina, while Cain had nine receptions in the victory at NC State.  Renfrow has 50 receptions to lead the team, while Cain paces the squad in reception yards with 620.

 

Freshman Travis Etienne, Clemson’s leading rusher with 720, and the ACC leader in yards per rushing attempt at 7.4, was also named to the third team.  Offensive lineman Taylor Hearn made third team All-ACC as a guard.

 

Kendall Joseph, Clemson’s second leading tackler, was the only Clemson defensive player named third team.

 

Four Tigers were named honorable mention.  That list included cornerbacks Ryan Carter and Trayvon Mullen, and offensive guard Sean Pollard.  Ray-Ray McCloud was named honorable mention as an all-purpose player and kick returner.

 

Clemson All-ACC Summary

First-Team (6):  Mitch Hyatt (OT), Tyrone Crowder (OG), Justin Falcinelli (C), Clelin Ferrell (DE), Christian Wilkins (DT), Dexter Lawrence (DT)

 

Second Team (2):  Austin Bryant (DE), Dorian O’Daniel (LB)

 

Third Team (5);  Hunter Renfrow (WR), Deon Cain (WR),  Travis Etienne (RB), Taylor Hearn (OG), Kendall Joseph (LB)

 

Honorable Mention (4):  Trayvon Mullen (CB), Ryan Carter (CB), Sean Pollard (OT), Ray-Ray McCloud (All-Purpose, kick return)